Baby Massage: Does it Really Work?

Caring for babies is not always easy. Gaining the support and expertise of a Certified Infant Massage Instructor is growing in popularity in Australia. A Certified Infant Massage Instructor can guide parents through the use of safe and effective massage techniques to help relax babies, helping them sleep and to promote their development.

Baby massage is an ancient tradition in many cultures. Historical evidence of massage dates back to 2330 BC. In Ancient India, Ayurveda medicine taught the use of Indian Infant Massage. Today, Infant Massage combines the traditional arts of Indian and Swedish massage, with aspects of reflexology to provide optimum benefits to baby and caregiver alike.

We know through research that babies who are massaged display better sleep patterns and have lower stress hormones than those who aren't. We also know that massage techniques can promote both their physical and speech development.

There are many ways of learning the art of Baby Massage. Many websites provide step-by-step instructions. There are also books and DVD's available.

A Certified Infant Massage Instructor can give parents hands on, safe massage instruction, often in the privacy of a parent's home. It is important for parents to know what oils are safe for their baby. It's also important for them to know when to massage, as babies can easily become overstimulated if massaged when they are tired.

A Certified Infant Massage Instructor can teach parents about using a "permission sequence" which ensures that their baby is comfortable and happy to receive their massage.

Massage classes generally run over 2-4 sessions of 1 - 2 hours each. The cost ranges from about $30 for a group session (as part of a 4 week course) to $120 for a private 2-hour session.

About the Author:

Marney Merritt is a Certified Infant Massage Instructor, Registered Nurse, Midwife and Child Health Nurse. As Founder of Rockabye Baby Massage she offers new parents a series of home visits to guide them through Infant Massage techniques, and the skills to pick up their baby's cues, promote their baby's development and bond with their baby through positive touch. Marney services most suburbs on the Northside of Brisbane.

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Where are you in your journey?

All journeys are unique and exciting, so we have matched our courses to your current stage of pregnancy or parenting. Simply select where you're up to below.

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