Acupuncture During Pregnancy

Acupuncturists describe the human condition as a reflection of the universe. The body is dynamic and is constantly subjected to, and defined by, internal and external environmental changes.

Acupuncture treatments are individualised and are based on the individual and not the condition. Therefore no two patients with the same symptoms will be treated the same.

Everything that defines a human being, from skin and bones to personal preferences and emotions, directly reflects the state and health of their internal organs. The essential purpose behind acupuncture is to rebalance the body’s harmony.

It is thought that inserting fine needles into the specific body points relevant to the individuals needs, will reconnect the body.

Risks With Acupuncture During Pregnancy:

Major adverse effects are extremely rare. It is important however, to make sure a professional licenced acupuncturist who uses sterile techniques and needles treats you.

What Has Research Told Us?

Current research is too small to be clinically important or to draw significant conclusions from. Furthermore as acupuncture involves many different styles and techniques, research cannot be generalised.

What we can extract from existing research is that there is little difference in the effects of reducing pain between acupuncture and sham ‘placebo’ acupuncture. Both have indicated small benefit in reducing pain. Acupuncture and sham acupuncture have greater efficacy when compared to patients who are left untreated. Therefore it could be said that getting acupuncture is more likely to provide pain relief than if you weren’t to get treated at all. Perhaps give it a go and see what happens!

Of course, as mentioned above, be sure to see a licensed, experienced acupuncturist and remember to inform them if you are pregnant. This is very important, as some acupuncture points have been found to induce labour.

About the Author:

Dr Grant Saffer is an Obstetrician and Gynaecologist consulting at the Epworth-Freemasons in East Melbourne. Grant specialises in complicated and high-risk pregnancies and ensures his patients are always given an exception level of care. Grant keeps his patients up-to-date with relevant information about their condition which enables them to make informed decisions about their pregnancy and delivery, taking into consideration their beliefs and therapeutic preferences.

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Where are you in your journey?

All journeys are unique and exciting, so we have matched our courses to your current stage of pregnancy or parenting. Simply select where you're up to below.

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