Varicose Veins and Haemorrhoids in Pregnancy

Varicose veins (and haemorrhoids) in pregnancy are unfortunately very common due to the weight of the your growing baby, pushing down on the veins in your pelvis and major blood vessel called the inferior vena cava.

Haemorrhoids are varicose veins of the rectal area.

Thankfully they generally cease to be a problem once your baby has been born.

There are a couple of things you can do to avoid or minimise the severity including eating a well balanced and fibrous diet, drinking plenty of fluids and engaging in some form of exercise every day. This will help avoid putting on too much weight too quickly, keep the circulation moving in your body and help you avoid constipation, which haemorrhoids are often a bi-product of.

Avoid sitting or standing for long periods of time and don’t cross your legs or feet. Wherever possible, take a load off and elevate your feet.

You can also use compression stockings to help prevent blood from pooling in your legs.

If haemorrhoids become a real issue, you can try sitting in a warm sitz bath. In more severe cases, your doctor may recommend an over-the-counter preparation to help ease the pain and reduce the inflammation.

  • Paternity and Partner Leave

    Since early 2011, Australia has had a Paid Parental Leave scheme. This allows eligible working parents to get paid for up to 18 weeks when they take time off work to care for a new baby or recently adopted child.

  • Driving and Seatbelt Safety During Pregnancy

    Driving during pregnancy can present a unique set of risks - it pays to be as informed as possible about the facts.

    Currently in Australia, there is no recommendation for pregnant women to stop driving. And it’s not illegal in any Australian State or Territory to drive during pregnancy.  The same road rules apply to all drivers, pregnant or otherwise. But pregnancy itself is not a reason to stop driving.

  • Is it Really Safe to Exercise in Pregnancy?

    Our understanding of exercise in pregnancy + postpartum has come a long way in the recent years, and we are much more likely to treat the “normal” pregnancy as a normal physiological process – not a disability.

  • Postpartum Exercise: How to Return Safely after Pregnancy and Childbirth

    Exercise in the postpartum period is helpful to regain your shape, increase your energy levels, lift your mood and give you the strength required for your new job of mothering. 

    Your new role will involve a lot of lifting, carrying, pushing, getting up from chairs and the floor, and holding for feeding. 

  • Recovering from Pregnancy and Birth

    After the birth of your baby there is a period of healing and physical adjustment from the effects of pregnancy as well as from your labour or delivery. 

    During pregnancy, there is increased pressure on the pelvic floor from your growing baby, placenta and extra fluid.

Where are you in your journey?

All journeys are unique and exciting, so we have matched our courses to your current stage of pregnancy or parenting. Simply select where you're up to below.

>